I’m always interested in new and unusual ways of depicting information. This video and sounds, of all the earthquakes in 2011, shows just how many sizable earthquakes there are around the world. Also, the huge Japanese earthquake (9.0) strikes at 1:50 into the video and it just dominates the video for months afterwards. I get USGS text message alerts for earthquakes over 6.0, and the night of the Japanese earthquake I had to shut my phone off as it was getting bombed by texts for the huge number of aftershocks.

(I found the video here).

T+1 y

2 comments

One year ago today, I had the incredible opportunity to watch the final launch of Space Shuttle Discovery to the International Space Station.

Thanks to NASA’s Tweetup program, I watched the launch from the Press area, met some astronauts and NASA people, and met a great group of fellow Tweeps!

I also had my awesome “Shuttle” beard. I vowed not to shave until Discovery launched after some launch delays in October 2011. Astronaut Leland Melvin was very brave to get close to the beard. I don’t know if it was his NASA training or his NFL experience that prepared him for the beard.

I always like seeing wild turkeys, but this one looks a bit goofy. This one was seen crossing the road in Parowan Utah on December 27, 2011.

I had a great time letting my children terrorize themselves with a sled last week.

I’m a great dad!

I’ve always wanted to try ice diving. I’ve heard that you can flip inverted, put some air in your BC, and stand on the bottom of the ice and walk around inverted. These crazy Finns took it to whole new level…..

Orbits

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While talking to people about space, I’ve noticed that many people don’t have a good idea on how low earth orbit satellites orbit the earth. This video about the impending Phobos Grunt reentry does a great job showing what a low earth orbit looks like.

Also, my condolences go out the Russian Space Agency on their loss of Phobos Grunt. It was a very ambitious mission, space exploration is extremely difficult, and losing their spacecraft had to be incredibly hard.

Wonderful World

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I’ve been watching The Life of Birds with David Attenborough and he is an amazing narrator. This is an great clip that makes me feel so thrilled to have chosen a career as a wildlife biologist.

Caroline, best wishes for a happy birthday!

Love, Dad

The lightheartedness of this video is great:

Just in case you are a wildlife biologist married to a mammologist and you are having a baby girl soon and you want to give the girl a name of a genus of mammals ending in “a” because the mom is Czech and Czech girl names end in “a” here is a list of the 209 genera that meet that criteria.

Abrocoma
Ailuropoda
Allactaga
Alouatta
Alticola
Amblyrhiza
Ametrida
Anathana
Anoura
Antilocapra
Aplodontia
Arctogalidia
Arvicola
Asellia
Babyrousa
Balaena
Balaenoptera
Bandicota
Barbastella
Bettongia
Blarina
Blarinella
Brachyphylla
Caperea
Capra
Cardioderma
Carollia
Carpitalpa
Catopuma
Cavia
Chaetocauda
Chinchilla
Chinchillula
Chiroderma
Chlorotalpa
Chodsigoa
Coleura
Condylura
Cormura
Crocidura
Crocuta
Cryptoprocta
Cystophora
Dactylopsila
Dama
Dasykaluta
Dasyprocta
Daubentonia
Desmana
Diphylla
Dobsonia
Echinoprocta
Echymipera
Ectophylla
Eira
Eligmodontia
Emballonura
Enhydra
Eremitalpa
Erophylla
Eubalaena
Euderma
Felovia
Feresa
Fossa
Galea
Galerella
Galidia
Gazella
Genetta
Giraffa
Glironia
Globicephala
Glossophaga
Golunda
Gorilla
Histriophoca
Hyaena
Hydrurga
Ia
Ichneumia
Inia
Kerivoula
Kogia
Kunsia
Lama
Lavia
Leggadina
Lonchophylla
Lonchorhina
Lontra
Lophostoma
Loxodonta
Lutra
Lutreolina
Macaca
Macroderma
Macrogalidia
Madoqua
Makalata
Marmosa
Marmota
Massoutiera
Mazama
Megaderma
Megaptera
Mellivora
Mesophylla
Microcavia
Micromurexia
Millardia
Mirounga
Mirza
Mogera
Moschiola
Mosia
Murexia
Murina
Mustela
Myoprocta
Myrmecophaga
Mystacina
Myzopoda
Nandinia
Nasua
Nasuella
Nelsonia
Neophoca
Neophocaena
Neoromicia
Neotoma
Nesokia
Ochotona
Okapia
Ommatophoca
Ondatra
Onychogalea
Orcaella
Otaria
Ourebia
Paguma
Panthera
Paracrocidura
Paramurexia
Pelea
Peponocephala
Petaurista
Phascomurexia
Philantomba
Phoca
Phocoena
Phylloderma
Pithecia
Plagiodontia
Platalina
Platanista
Podogymnura
Poiana
Pontoporia
Procapra
Procavia
Pseudorca
Pteronura
Puma
Pusa
Pygoderma
Quemisia
Ratufa
Redunca
Rhinophylla
Rhinopoma
Rhizoplagiodontia
Rhogeessa
Rupicapra
Rusa
Saiga
Salanoia
Selevinia
Sicista
Sotalia
Sousa
Stenella
Stenoderma
Sturnira
Suricata
Sylvicapra
Tadarida
Talpa
Tamandua
Tatera
Taxidea
Thyroptera
Tokudaia
Tonatia
Tscherskia
Tupaia
Uncia
Uroderma
Vampyressa
Vandeleuria
Varecia
Vernaya
Vicugna
Viverra
Viverricula
Vormela
Wallabia
Wyulda
Zenkerella

Congratulations, Aaron and Tereza!

List is taken from Don E. Wilson & DeeAnn M. Reeder (editors). 2005. Mammal Species of the World. A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed), Johns Hopkins University Press, 2,142 pp. Thankfully, they have a CSV file and Excel easily handles searches for strings.